Recent Highlights from Our Collection

Below are highlights from our most recent acquisitions. Research Connections scans its newest acquisitions, focusing on those from key organizations and journals, to identify resources to feature here.

How do the development and early home experiences of Latino boys from birth to kindergarten entry compare to those of other peer groups?

The development and early home experiences of young Latino boys
Cabrera, Natasha J., 02/01/2017
Bethesda, MD: National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families. Retrieved from http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Development-and-Early-Home-Env-of-Latino-Boys.pdf

This brief compares the development and early home environment of Latino boys to those of two peer groups--white boys and Latina girls--from birth to kindergarten entry. We chose these two comparisons to understand how Latino boys' early development differs across ethnicity (compared to white boys, holding gender constant) and across gender (compared to Latina girls, holding ethnicity constant). Our focus is on the early childhood period because this is a time when children develop the foundational cognitive, language, and socio-emotional skills they need for formal schooling and for later life success, and because home and family experiences during this early period tend to have long-lasting effects on children. Understanding the nature of differences in development and early home environment can inspire interventions that would help Latino boys thrive. (author abstract)

Check out the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families brief series including the first demographic portrait of Latino fathers?take a peek into Latino family life to examine how mothers, fathers, and boys are faring.

What are the extent and nature of low-income parents' interactions with other parents and staff at child care centers?

Low-income parents' adult interactions at childcare centres
Reid, Jeanne, 01/01/2017

Little is known about the extent and nature of low-income parents' interactions with other parents and staff at childcare centres, despite the potential for these interactions to provide emotional, informational, and instrumental support. This study interviewed 51 parents at three childcare centres in low-income neighbourhoods in New York City. Twenty-six per cent of parents reported talking with other parents at drop-off and pick-up, and another 35% reported meeting with parents outside the centre in addition to talking with them at the centre. Parents' extent of interaction was related to how long they spent at drop-off and pick-up, their participation in centre activities, and their sociability in general. All parents reported interacting with teachers and administrators, and described them more often than other parents as good sources of information and advice. We discuss the implications for parents and centre-based childcare providers. (author abstract)

How do experiences of adversity relate to indicators of child well-being in a high quality early education context?

Associations of adversity to indicators of child well being in a high quality early education context
Guss, Shannon S., 01/01/2016

Studies have shown that adversity in childhood has harmful effects on well-being across the lifespan. This study examined the prevalence of children's cumulative experiences of adversity, based on parent report, in a national sample of low-income children (N=3,208) enrolled in a high quality early childhood education (ece) program. It explored the association between family adversity that occurred within the year prior to the parents' interview and the child's well-being measured after the interview. Well-being was based on language, school readiness, and social emotional outcomes. Almost half of all families reported experiencing at least one adversity. Family adversity was associated with worse school readiness and health outcomes. Adversity had mixed associations with social-emotional outcomes and no association with language outcomes. This study also explored time enrolled in ece (dosage) as a protective or promotive factor in relation to adversity. Time in program had a positive relationship to most child outcomes and could be interpreted as a promotive factor within the context of adversity for all outcomes except behavioral concerns. (author abstract)

What are the latest methods of engaging families in early childhood education?

Family involvement in early education and child care [Special issue]
Sutterby, John A., 01/01/2016

A special issue of the journal Advances in Early Education and Day Care, focusing on methods of engaging families in early childhood education.

What are the findings from an exploratory survey of Illinois child care resource and referral specialists who work to support family child care providers?

Supporting family child care and quality improvement: Findings from an exploratory survey of Illinois child care resource and referral agency staff
Bromer, Juliet, 09/17/2016

Improved quality in home-based child care (family child care and family, friend, and neighbor care) is increasingly recognized as a vital component of early care and education service systems in the U.S. and abroad and is a target of recent federal and state policy initiatives in the U.S. This article presents data from a statewide survey of 73 child care resource and referral specialists across Illinois who work with family child care providers on a regular basis through home visiting, training, and technical assistance. Descriptive findings suggest that specialists who work with family child care providers perform a unique role in the early care and education field. The study examines job roles, common challenges and rewards, and needs for training. Specialists' training needs include understanding the unique context of family child care, home visiting, coaching, and working with families. Understanding the training and professional development needs of support staff as well as the challenges faced in carrying out this work has the potential to inform state professional development systems as well as other initiatives aimed at improving quality in this sector of the early care and education workforce. (author abstract)

Check out Research Connections brief on Quality improvement in home-based child care settings: Research resources to inform policy.

How can educators use preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction to build on and sustain the positive effects of preschool?

Case studies of schools implementing early elementary strategies: Preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction
Manship, Karen, 12/01/2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service. Retrieved from https://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/implementing-early-strategies/report.pdf

Participation in high-quality preschool can improve academic, behavioral, social-emotional, and cognitive outcomes for students of varying backgrounds, including students from disadvantaged backgrounds (e.g., Andrews, Jargowsky, and Kuhne 2012; Barnett 2008; Camilli et al. 2010; Karoly and Bigelow 2005; Reynolds et al. 2007). However, some studies have found that some of these benefits do not persist into third grade (e.g., Bogard and Takanishi 2005; Li et al. 2013; Lipsey, Farran, and Hofer 2015; Puma et al. 2012). Without additional and continuous supports as children proceed through the elementary grades, participation in preschool does not inoculate against the potential challenges that children, particularly children at risk for poorer academic outcomes, may face. To explore how educators might build on and sustain the positive effects of preschool, this study examined two types of strategies that preliminary literature searches revealed as promising practices to support children's learning in early elementary school: (1) aligning instruction from preschool through grade 3 (referred to as P-3 alignment) and (2) differentiated instruction. The P-3 alignment strategy emphasizes coordination among standards, curricula, instructional practices and environments, student assessment, and teacher professional development between the preschool years and the early elementary school years. The differentiated instruction strategy focuses on teachers varying their pedagogical practices to meet the diverse needs and skills of individual students. To explore how educators use these two strategies, this study conducted a systematic literature review followed by case studies of five programs that used one or both of these two strategies. The case studies focused on the approaches programs used to implement P-3 and differentiated instruction; some of the approaches revealed may be relevent to early elementary strategies beyond the two strategies studied. This report focuses on the findings of the case studies. (author abstract)

What are the challenges of translating early childhood education and care (ECEC) longitudinal research studies into policy?

Longitudinal studies in ECEC: Challenges of translating research results into policy actions [Topical collection]
Kalicki, Bernhard,

A topical collection of articles from the International Journal of Child Care and Educational Policy, focusing on the challenges of translating early childhood education and care (ECEC) longitudinal research studies into policy in multiple countries

How do CCDF funding and policies influence the employment outcomes of low income mothers?

Effects of the CCDF subsidy program on the employment outcomes of low income mothers
Enchautegui, Maria E., 12/01/2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. Retrieved from https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/253961/EffectsCCSubsidiesMaternalLFPTechnical.pdf

One of the purposes of the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) is to provide parents with child care to enable their work. In FY2014, 1.4 million children (from 853,000 families) received subsidies through this program averaging $4,800 per year. Total spending on direct services was $6.6 billion in FY 2014 (most recent year available). Supporting parental employment remains an important goal of the CCDF, and recent legislative and administrative efforts have also emphasized supporting children's development and improving the quality of its programs. While research generally supports the employment benefits of child care more generally, there are a limited number of studies that have assessed the employment benefits of CCDF-funded child care in particular, and in the United States context. This study aims to fill that gap and provide a contemporary understanding of how CCDF funding and policies influence maternal employment across states. (author abstract)

To see a complete list of new research, please view Archived New Research.